krogancuddles:

tatreezconsciousness:

hardcore-kawaii-hijabi:

majestic

me ridin in to whoop ur butts

file under: people i would follow into battle

krogancuddles:

tatreezconsciousness:

hardcore-kawaii-hijabi:

majestic

me ridin in to whoop ur butts

file under: people i would follow into battle

(Source: tajh831, via what-ciabatta-with-you)


tagged as: #women #fashion #whoa


aint-got-nothin-at-all:

boobsbirdsbotany:


Real life “Rosie the Riveter” - Tennessee, 1943.
From the Library of Congress collection, 1930’s-1940’s in Color. 

GLORIFY THE SHIT OUT OF THIS IMAGE

!!!!!!!!

aint-got-nothin-at-all:

boobsbirdsbotany:

Real life “Rosie the Riveter” - Tennessee, 1943.

From the Library of Congress collection, 1930’s-1940’s in Color

GLORIFY THE SHIT OUT OF THIS IMAGE

!!!!!!!!

(via bankotsedo)


tagged as: #women


tagged as: #women #nsfw


"

I don’t know if some of you have been to these live reads at LACMA, where a classic film is read live on stage by actors who just sit and read the script. We did one recently of American Pie, but we reversed the gender roles. All the women played men; all the men played women. And it was so fascinating to be a part of this because, as the women took on these central roles — they had all the good lines, they had all the good laughs, all the great moments — the men who joined us to sit on stage started squirming rather uncomfortably and got really bored because they weren’t used to being the supporting cast.

It was fascinating to feel their discomfort [and] to discuss it with them afterward, when they said, “It’s boring to play the girl role!” And I said, “Yeah. Yeah. You think? Welcome to our world!

"

- —Olivia Wilde crushing it when she talks about women in Hollywood. (via amyjellicoes)

(Source: leanin, via meteorflowerr)





i-freakin-love-disney:

killerdraco:

memewhore:

disneyworldwonders:

Can I just say that I think this is the way Mulan should appear int the parks. In the beginning of the movie they make it very clear that the dress she wears to meet the matchmaker is not comfortable nor does it represent her personality. She spends the whole of the film proving that she is not a prize to be won or just a pawn to be married off at earliest convenience. She proves her worth in this outfit. She saves China in this outfit. She falls in love in this outfit. She risks her life, makes her strongest friendships, and changes the entire country IN THIS OUTFIT. Then they have her walk around the park in the same outfit she wore in the first scene of the movie and I think it is really negative toward her character. That is not who she is.



I’ve seen this post pop up on my dash time and time again, and it’s never quite sat right with me. I agree 120% with the idea that the pink “matchmaker dress” is a poor way to represent Mulan in the theme parks, but… so is her soldier armor. It’s just as much not who she is as the pink dress. It represents her pretending to be Ping, and her deceiving everyone around her. It is her pretending to be a man, to be someone else entirely. Honestly, if you want to talk about the outfit that best represents her, I’d suggest this one:

The outfit she wore when she defeated Shan Yu. That is who Mulan is; a warrior, but still a woman. It displays all of the strength that she truly has, yet still manages to be true to who she truly is. This it the outfit that she changed the entire country in; would anything have changed if she was still pretending to be a man? I doubt it. This proves that a woman can be strong, but still be feminine. Given that many people tend to equate being feminine with weakness, I think portraying that the two are not mutually exclusive is a damn powerful message to be portraying to kids in theme parks.
Just my two cents.

THANK YOU

i-freakin-love-disney:

killerdraco:

memewhore:

disneyworldwonders:

Can I just say that I think this is the way Mulan should appear int the parks. In the beginning of the movie they make it very clear that the dress she wears to meet the matchmaker is not comfortable nor does it represent her personality. She spends the whole of the film proving that she is not a prize to be won or just a pawn to be married off at earliest convenience. She proves her worth in this outfit. She saves China in this outfit. She falls in love in this outfit. She risks her life, makes her strongest friendships, and changes the entire country IN THIS OUTFIT. Then they have her walk around the park in the same outfit she wore in the first scene of the movie and I think it is really negative toward her character. That is not who she is.

image

I’ve seen this post pop up on my dash time and time again, and it’s never quite sat right with me. I agree 120% with the idea that the pink “matchmaker dress” is a poor way to represent Mulan in the theme parks, but… so is her soldier armor. It’s just as much not who she is as the pink dress. It represents her pretending to be Ping, and her deceiving everyone around her. It is her pretending to be a man, to be someone else entirely. Honestly, if you want to talk about the outfit that best represents her, I’d suggest this one:

image

The outfit she wore when she defeated Shan Yu. That is who Mulan is; a warrior, but still a woman. It displays all of the strength that she truly has, yet still manages to be true to who she truly is. This it the outfit that she changed the entire country in; would anything have changed if she was still pretending to be a man? I doubt it. This proves that a woman can be strong, but still be feminine. Given that many people tend to equate being feminine with weakness, I think portraying that the two are not mutually exclusive is a damn powerful message to be portraying to kids in theme parks.

Just my two cents.

THANK YOU

(Source: Flickr / klingon65, via flitterflutterandfly)


tagged as: #love this #mulan #disney #women


blackhistoryalbum:

PHILLIS WHEATLEY, THE PHILOSOPHER  POETThe statue is part of the Boston Women’s Memorial on Commonwealth Avenue, a series of three statues of Bostonian women by Meredith Bergmann: Wheatley, Abigail Adams, and Lucy Stone.
Phillis Wheatley (ca. 1753-1784), an eighteenth-century African-American woman who was a slave and a poet, was the first black American to be published. She is also credited with originating the genres of African-American poetry and African-American women’s literature.
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blackhistoryalbum:

PHILLIS WHEATLEY, THE PHILOSOPHER  POET
The statue is part of the Boston Women’s Memorial on Commonwealth Avenue, a series of three statues of Bostonian women by Meredith Bergmann: Wheatley, Abigail Adams, and Lucy Stone.

Phillis Wheatley (ca. 1753-1784), an eighteenth-century African-American woman who was a slave and a poet, was the first black American to be published. She is also credited with originating the genres of African-American poetry and African-American women’s literature.

Follow us on Tumblr  Pinterest  Facebook  Twitter

(via kooperfan)


tagged as: #boston #women



“I always get asked, ‘Where do you get your confidence?’ I think people are well meaning, but it’s pretty insulting. Because what it means to me is, ‘You, Mindy Kaling, have all the trappings of a very marginalized person. You’re not skinny, you’re not white, you’re a woman. Why on earth would you feel like you’re worth anything?’”

“I always get asked, ‘Where do you get your confidence?’ I think people are well meaning, but it’s pretty insulting. Because what it means to me is, ‘You, Mindy Kaling, have all the trappings of a very marginalized person. You’re not skinny, you’re not white, you’re a woman. Why on earth would you feel like you’re worth anything?’”

(Source: mayawiig, via baelor)




(Source: m0rfine, via queenellsa)


tagged as: #women


cinque-spotted:

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes
Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.
One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge by offered a counter challenge,
 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her adversary to meet her on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter would hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”
Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.
After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.
By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

#THIS IS FREAKIN COOL AS SHIT #can we just note the last paragraph #’victorian era prejudices against women drove the sport underground’ #you’re saying ‘turned fighting into a gentleman’s sport’ but all i’m seeng is VICTORIAN LADY FIGHT CLUB#WHERE ARE THE NOVELS? GIVE ME NOVELS #MAKE THE LADIES KISS#MAKE THE LADIES TELL THEIR HUSBANDS THEY’RE OFF TO SEE THEIR SISTERS FOR TEA #MAKE THE LADIES SWAP TIPS ON HOW TO BANDAGE THEIR KNUCKLES AND CONCEAL BRUISES WITH POWDER #MAKE THE LADIES PASS EACH OTHER FLASKS OF BRANDY WHILE THEY’RE SITTING ON THE SIDELINES TENDING THEIR INJURIES AND WATCHING THE NEXT FIGHT#MAKE THE LADIES WEAR LOOSE BREECHES AND PRACTICAL RIDING BOOTS#MAKE THE LADIES COME FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE; MAKE A PICKPOCKET STRIKE UP A FRIENDSHIP SLASH RIVALRY WITH THE DAUGHTER OF A COUNTESS #MAKE THE LADIES KISS!!!!!!!!!!!!! #i’m fine. i’m fine. #history (via marthur)

cinque-spotted:

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes

Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.

One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge by offered a counter challenge,

 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her adversary to meet her on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter would hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”

Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.

After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.

By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

          (via marthur)

(Source: peashooter85, via innuendium)


tagged as: #women


davidmalki:

Daughters of the horse-leech, thy tempest out-thunders me.
source: Israel Zangwill, Without Prejudice, 1899. This description, at the time meant to be as absurd a set of charges and demands as could be placed in a straw woman’s mouth, today reads like a beautiful manifesto.

davidmalki:

Daughters of the horse-leech, thy tempest out-thunders me.

source: Israel Zangwill, Without Prejudice, 1899. This description, at the time meant to be as absurd a set of charges and demands as could be placed in a straw woman’s mouth, today reads like a beautiful manifesto.

(via flitterflutterandfly)


tagged as: #women #damn




(via googleyfish)


tagged as: #women #yea


femmesandfamily:

venelite:

2013

This was the year when I was brave enough to upload a full figure picture of myself

this was the year I was brave enough to photograph myself nude

this was the year I got my first tattoo, three tattoos

the year I pierced my bellybutton after always thinking that only skinny people got their bellybutton pierced

the year I blogged and didn’t delete my blog

the year I cut my hair short

the year I found out what I wanted to do

this was the year I left the nest

the year only self-harmed twice

the year I found out how loved I am

:*3

(via googleyfish)


tagged as: #women


curveappeal:

Today, I am 149lbs even though my doctor says my ideal weight is 125lbs for my height. I’ve spent many, many years trying to lose weight and trying to whittle my waist down to the perfect hourglass shape…but I was never satisfied with myself.
I took this picture the other day and I loved it, but I was afraid to post it on my page at first because I was so self-conscious.The more I looked at it, the more flaws I could see. You can see the little fat pouch on my stomach that I’ve tried so hard to get rid of. My arms are chubby. My thighs are so thick and blurred together that it looks like I have one giant thigh. My hair is frizzy and doesn’t quite lay right over my shoulder. The only positive thing I noticed about this picture was that my chubby arm blocked out the back fat that was poking out of my backless dress. 
But when this picture did go up, I got so many compliments. I usually only post face photos, but after I put this picture up, I had so many compliments about how gorgeous, beautiful, and “thick” I was. I felt good about myself. I was relieved that they didn’t see all the little flaws that I saw in myself. They just…thought I was beautiful. 
There are a lot of emotional scars that still need to be healed, but I think that I’m finally ready to stop hating my body and start accepting it as it is.

curveappeal:

Today, I am 149lbs even though my doctor says my ideal weight is 125lbs for my height. I’ve spent many, many years trying to lose weight and trying to whittle my waist down to the perfect hourglass shape…but I was never satisfied with myself.

I took this picture the other day and I loved it, but I was afraid to post it on my page at first because I was so self-conscious.The more I looked at it, the more flaws I could see. You can see the little fat pouch on my stomach that I’ve tried so hard to get rid of. My arms are chubby. My thighs are so thick and blurred together that it looks like I have one giant thigh. My hair is frizzy and doesn’t quite lay right over my shoulder. The only positive thing I noticed about this picture was that my chubby arm blocked out the back fat that was poking out of my backless dress. 

But when this picture did go up, I got so many compliments. I usually only post face photos, but after I put this picture up, I had so many compliments about how gorgeous, beautiful, and “thick” I was. I felt good about myself. I was relieved that they didn’t see all the little flaws that I saw in myself. They just…thought I was beautiful. 

There are a lot of emotional scars that still need to be healed, but I think that I’m finally ready to stop hating my body and start accepting it as it is.


tagged as: #women


niklii:

cloudyskiesandcatharsis:

Mirrors and Windows by Gabriele Galimberti and Edoardo Dilelle

The portrait series draws insight into the lives of women across the world based on their intimate living spaces.While some have countless possessions, living in the lap of luxury, others are clearly not as fortunate.

The project states: “In a world that is increasingly shaped by global standardization and IKEA aesthetics, this work explores the rooms of the conventional and the eccentric, the rich and the poor, the mother and the single, the pious and the unbelieving, the sports-obsessed and the shopping-addicted, the tomboy and the girly-girl, the tidy and the shambolic… These bedrooms are the mirrors of the history, personality, culture, obsessions and social status of the girls that occupy them, but are also unique windows into these young women’s worlds.

Source: Gabriele Galimberti website

             Edoardo Delille website

I still love this. 

(via icomealiveinthenight)


tagged as: #photography #women