23pairsofchromosomes:

Butterfly eggs on a raspberry plant
A micro-crack in steel
Household dust
Needle and thread
E.coli bacteria on lettuce

Beard hairs under a scanning electron microscope: cut with razor (left) and electric shaver (right)
A moth wing
Leaf of a Virginia spiderwort
Marijuana
Shark skin

23pairsofchromosomes:

Butterfly eggs on a raspberry plantA micro-crack in steel

A micro-crack in steelHousehold dust

Household dustNeedle and thread

Needle and threadE.coli bacteria on lettuce

E.coli bacteria on lettuce

Beard hairs under a scanning electron microscope: cut with razor (left) and electric shaver (right)

Beard hairs under a scanning electron microscope: cut with razor (left) and electric shaver (right)A moth wing

A moth wingLeaf of a Virginia spiderwort

Leaf of a Virginia spiderwortMarijuana

Marijuanashark skin

Shark skin

(via sbwafflecone)


tagged as: #:0 #science #idk tag


libutron:

Brookite | ©Fine Mineral Galleries
Kharan, Balochistan (Baluchistan), Pakistan.

libutron:

Brookite | ©Fine Mineral Galleries

Kharan, Balochistan (Baluchistan), Pakistan.

(via geologynerd)


tagged as: #cooool #science #minerals


compoundchem:

Added a newer, poster friendly version of the Metal Ion Flame Test Colours graphic to the store today! You can view the original post here, which includes an explanation of the origin of the colours.

compoundchem:

Added a newer, poster friendly version of the Metal Ion Flame Test Colours graphic to the store today! You can view the original post here, which includes an explanation of the origin of the colours.

(via cleofrom5to7)


tagged as: #science #nostalgia


themineralogist:

Scheelite Fluorescence in Shortwave UV (by Sea Moon)

themineralogist:

Scheelite Fluorescence in Shortwave UV (by Sea Moon)


tagged as: #minerals #science


mineralists:


Synchysite

mineralists:

Synchysite

(Source: flickr.com, via geologynerd)


tagged as: #minerals #science


 




givemeinternet:

As close as you will ever be to a nuclear explosion

 

givemeinternet:

As close as you will ever be to a nuclear explosion

(via plantainfish)


tagged as: #science #?? #tag?


shetan:

mc-coolin:

sexualanomaly:

dollybopp:

267198:

theswindlr:

Frozen Peas from SuckUK; a fantastic piece of design as metaphor (as well as a super convenient way to make a spherical ice “cube”.

via Gizmodo

If you truly love me you will buy this for me.

moonrisezeeba

ALRIGHT TUMBLR PEOPLE LISTEN UP FOR FUN SCIENCE TIME!

Sphere basically take less energy to form because of SURFACE ENERGY. Sphere have a lower surface area to volume ratio. Because of this, ice sphere melt slower than your usual cubes. This is the reason at fancy fancy bars with those $30+ glass of bourbon or scotch may serve your drink using these instead of normal ice.

thank you nerd

IT’S LIKE EDAMAME ICE AAAAAAHHH

(via rapturous-symphonies)


tagged as: #science #interesting


(Source: ForGIFs.com, via midnightquiet)


tagged as: #science


Match Burning In Slow Motion

(Source: descepter, via sbwafflecone)


tagged as: #science


ggeology:

Phillipsite // Germany

ggeology:

Phillipsite // Germany

(Source: zeolite-collection.eu, via geologynerd)


tagged as: #science #minerals


actegratuit:

DUKNO YOON

Assistant Professor, Metalsmithing & Jewelry

Emaildukno@ksu.edu
Websitehttp://www.duknoyoon.com

(via bochiboche)




"

“Consider that you can see less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum and hear less than 1% of the acoustic spectrum. As you read this, you are traveling at 220 km/sec across the galaxy. 90% of the cells in your body carry their own microbial DNA and are not “you.” The atoms in your body are 99.9999999999999999% empty space and none of them are the ones you were born with, but they all originated in the belly of a star. Human beings have 46 chromosomes, 2 less than the common potato.

The existence of the rainbow depends on the conical photoreceptors in your eyes; to animals without cones, the rainbow does not exist. So you don’t just look at a rainbow, you create it. This is pretty amazing, especially considering that all the beautiful colors you see represent less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum.”

"

- We Originated in the Belly of a Star, NASA Lunar Science Institute, 2012. (via thinksquad)

(via rapturous-symphonies)





"

If you want to foster those creative, problem solving skills, the solution isn’t learning to code – it’s learning to paint. Or play an instrument. Or write poetry. Or sculpt. The field doesn’t matter: the key thing is that if you want to foster your own innovative creativity, the best way to do it is to seriously pursue an artistic endeavor.

In the history of the Nobel Prize, nearly every Laureate has pursued the arts. According to research by psychologists Michele and Robert Root-Bernstein, “almost all Nobel laureates in the sciences actively engage in arts as adults. They are twenty-five times as likely as the average scientist to sing, dance, or act; seventeen times as likely to be a visual artist; twelve times more likely to write poetry and literature; eight times more likely to do woodworking or some other craft; four times as likely to be a musician; and twice as likely to be a photographer.”

"

-

Perhaps you don’t need to learn to code.

For a testament to the Nobel observation, see Richard Feynman’s sketches and drawings. We also know that Einstein worked out some of his most difficult physics problems while playing violin

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via luminarystudies)



tagged as: #quotes #interesting #science


theuppitynegras:

all-the-other-humans:

Fucking physics

this is why I refuse to take physics

theuppitynegras:

all-the-other-humans:

Fucking physics

this is why I refuse to take physics

(Source: engineeringnow, via two-toes)


tagged as: #science #so cool


odditiesoflife:

Rare Ice Disks

Although extremely rare, ice disks, also known as ice circles, do indeed appear naturally from time to time when conditions are perfect. Above are a few examples of people who have been lucky enough to stumble onto one while holding a camera.

Ice discs form on the outer bends in a river where the accelerating water creates a force called ‘rotational shear’, which breaks off a chunk of ice and twists it around. As the disc rotates, it grinds against surrounding ice — smoothing into a circle. A relatively uncommon phenomenon, one of the earliest recordings is of a slowly revolving disc was spotted on the Mianus River and reported in a 1895 edition of Scientific American.

source 1, 2

(via so-this-one-bitch)


tagged as: #science #winter