shitifindon:

skysquids:

jhameia:

driftingfocus:

anogoodrabblerouser:

disquietingtruths:

universalequalityisinevitable:

Robert Sapolsky about his study of the Keekorok baboon troop from National Geographic’s Stress: Portrait of a Killer.

Thiiiiiiis, people, thiiiis!

1. Kill alpha male types
2. Achieve world peace

Got it.

I’ve actually read a lot of Sapolsky’s work.  He’s one of my favorite scientists in the neuro/socio world.

I just watched the documentary and there is so much more about the troop that isn’t in this photoset—not only does the troop have a culture of little aggression and greater cooperation, but any incoming jerk baboons learned within a few months that their shitty behaviour was in no way acceptable, that the troop only rewarded sociability, and they changed accordingly. 

If effin’ baboons can learn this there’s pretty much no reason to believe that our only option in dealing with assholes is to just ignore their behaviour and let it continue.

there really is no excuse.

"incoming jerk baboons" hahaha

(via lupercos)




miniprof:

OH before I  go to bed I should convey to you all the weirdest fact I learned today

I learned that when a caterpillar is metamorphosing into a butterfly within the cocoon, it is not, as I previously assumed, slowly growing wings and little antennae and whatever else. If we open a cocoon, apparently what we find is that the caterpillar has actually dissolved into a shapeless goo, from which the butterfly will be formed.

goo.

From which the butterfly is formed.

You can, of course, go the philosophical route with this: are they, then, the same creature, pre- and post- this complete reconstitution of the self? If the very brain, the nervous system, has been completely reassembled, how do we identify this as in any way the same?

So here’s the kicker.

Apparently one scientist figured he’d test this out by training a bunch of caterpillars to react negatively to a specific scent, which they would normally not react negatively to. This was all done prior to the cocoon stage.

And these butterflies. These post-goo, completely remade selves? They reacted negatively to the scent, too.

OKAY GOODNIGHT

(via baelor)




http://baelor.tumblr.com/post/86920002059/miniprof-oh-before-i-go-to-bed-i-should-convey 

miniprof:

OH before I go to bed I should convey to you all the weirdest fact I learned today

I learned that when a caterpillar is metamorphosing into a butterfly within the cocoon, it is not, as I previously assumed, slowly growing wings and little antennae and whatever else. If we open a…


tagged as: #science #nature #biology


womaninterrupted:

policymic:

Stunning photos of tears under a microscope vary by emotion

Follow policymic

"The project, called "The Topography of Tears," captures unique moments in human experience, but there’s also a scientific reason why every tear looks so different. There are three different types of tears: basal (lubricating), reflex (responding to stimuli) and psychic (triggered by emotion). Each type of tear contains different organic substances, and the molecular makeup depends on the causative agent. For instance, emotional tears contain the neurotransmitter leucine enkephalin, a natural painkiller that the body releases to mitigate stress."

(Source: micdotcom, via sisterscamp)


tagged as: #biology #science #cool


marjoleinhoekendijk:

stunningpicture:

A fin whale skeleton lies beneath the water of a lake in Svalbard, Norway.

☽☉☾ Pagan, Viking, Nature and Tolkien things ☽☉☾

marjoleinhoekendijk:

stunningpicture:

A fin whale skeleton lies beneath the water of a lake in Svalbard, Norway.

☽☉☾ Pagan, Viking, Nature and Tolkien things ☽☉☾


tagged as: #whoooa #nature #biology




(Source: moshita, via turquoiseowls)


tagged as: #biology


(Source: ziggyminx, via turquoiseowls)


tagged as: #animals #biology #nature


wunderscheisse:

In recent years, biologists have recognized that birds engage in play. Juvenile Common Ravens are among the most playful of bird species. They have been observed to slide down snowbanks, apparently purely for fun. They even engage in games with other species, such as playing catch-me-if-you-can with wolves, otters and dogs.[77] Common Ravens are known for spectacular aerobatic displays, such as flying in loops or interlocking talons with each other in flight.[78][79]

They are also one of only a few wild animals who make their own toys. They have been observed breaking off twigs to play with socially.[80]

this is so precious omg

(via googleyfish)




It’s really interesting that birds so commonly make their nests right up next to people’s houses. You’d think they’d be frightened to leave their children so close to humans. But if you think about it we typically leave their nests untouched and don’t prey on baby birds. It might be a form of symbiosis where most predators are scared to approach human homes and the babies are actually safer.


tagged as: #birds #animals #biology


airagorncharda:

This hit me like a ton of bricks. I’m still feeling a little nauseous after this realization.

I also put it on DA

(via romanovaries)


tagged as: #science #biology #anthropology


josephdenne:

You look just like your father: split face portraits of family members

Ulric Collette is a photographer from Quebec. He studied art and graphic design at school and currently works as an art director for Collette, an advertising studio in Quebec City.

In this series, called Genetic Portraits, Ulric splices together portraits of family members to explore genetic similarities.

From parents and their children, to twins, siblings and cousins, the series is fascinating, and just a little bit spooky.

The project was shortlisted for a Cannes Lion.

Visit genetic.ulriccollette.com to see the entire collection.

(via heynonnynonnie)


tagged as: #genetics #family #biology


How do animals change color?

the science of chromatophores

Animals like cuttlefish and chameleons are able to quickly change color in-order to blend in with their surroundings. They can do this due to a special type of cell called a chromatophore. Chromatophores work by moving vesicles that contain different color pigments into different forms by contracting and expanding them, so a different color comes to the “surface” when moved, giving the animal a different color. This can either be controlled by the animals nerves or happen hormonally.

Source

(Source: astronomy-to-zoology, via onetonmegagun)


tagged as: #biology #science


edwardspoonhands:

syaoranxiaoli:

edwardspoonhands:

witchcitybitch:

gooomoon:


A fairy ring is a naturally occurring ring of mushrooms. They are also known as pixie’s rings, faerie circles, or elf circles. The English believed that fairy rings were where fairies came to dance and celebrate, the mushrooms of the rings were used as stools for the fairies to recuperate during the evenings festivities.


When I was young I spent a lot of time in Ireland because my parents would always want to go back to their homes often. My mum used to tell me about faerie circles and she said that if you disturbed the ring by touching it, all the magic creatures would come and get you. I actually saw one of these rings for myself and was terrified the elves would come for me.

HANK HAS TO SCIENCE ON THIS
When the spore of some kinds of mushroom hits the ground to begin its life cycle, it will radiate out from the point of genesis with tiny little threads called mycelium which are actually the physical body of the fungus. The mycelium stretches throughout the soil, feeding by decomposing matter and, if there’s good food and consistent soil structure in every direction, it will radiate out in a nearly perfect circle. Eventually, when the center of the ring runs out of nutrients, the fungus goes into it’s spore production phase, and sends up “mushrooms” or the fruiting bodies of the fungus. These are all produced at the same time around the edge of the mycelium, taking all of the nutrients from the mycelium to produce these reproductive spore factories.
So each mushroom is not an individual organism, but rather the fruit of a sort of sub-surface fungal tree.
To me, this is even cooler than elves and fairies.

well let’s just keep them faerie circles because I’d like children to keep their fantasies and childhood memories

Agree to disagree…I would rather children revel in the excitement, beauty, wonder, and power of the real.

see I always think it’s more fun to combine them. like explain to your child “see that circle, those mushrooms are all part of one huge organism, like the roots of the tree, and those mushrooms are like fruit with spores instead of seeds. And some people think fairies gather in these circles when no one is looking ooooohh” and tell them the whole ‘fairy circle’ tale.
why not combine folklore with science? everyone likes a good story and fantasy, whimsy and magic are good for the soul and the imagination. but the story is more thrilling and amazing the more you know factually about it. 

edwardspoonhands:

syaoranxiaoli:

edwardspoonhands:

witchcitybitch:

gooomoon:

A fairy ring is a naturally occurring ring of mushrooms. They are also known as pixie’s rings, faerie circles, or elf circles. The English believed that fairy rings were where fairies came to dance and celebrate, the mushrooms of the rings were used as stools for the fairies to recuperate during the evenings festivities.

When I was young I spent a lot of time in Ireland because my parents would always want to go back to their homes often. My mum used to tell me about faerie circles and she said that if you disturbed the ring by touching it, all the magic creatures would come and get you. I actually saw one of these rings for myself and was terrified the elves would come for me.

HANK HAS TO SCIENCE ON THIS

When the spore of some kinds of mushroom hits the ground to begin its life cycle, it will radiate out from the point of genesis with tiny little threads called mycelium which are actually the physical body of the fungus. The mycelium stretches throughout the soil, feeding by decomposing matter and, if there’s good food and consistent soil structure in every direction, it will radiate out in a nearly perfect circle. Eventually, when the center of the ring runs out of nutrients, the fungus goes into it’s spore production phase, and sends up “mushrooms” or the fruiting bodies of the fungus. These are all produced at the same time around the edge of the mycelium, taking all of the nutrients from the mycelium to produce these reproductive spore factories.

So each mushroom is not an individual organism, but rather the fruit of a sort of sub-surface fungal tree.

To me, this is even cooler than elves and fairies.

well let’s just keep them faerie circles because I’d like children to keep their fantasies and childhood memories

Agree to disagree…I would rather children revel in the excitement, beauty, wonder, and power of the real.

see I always think it’s more fun to combine them. like explain to your child “see that circle, those mushrooms are all part of one huge organism, like the roots of the tree, and those mushrooms are like fruit with spores instead of seeds. And some people think fairies gather in these circles when no one is looking ooooohh” and tell them the whole ‘fairy circle’ tale.

why not combine folklore with science? everyone likes a good story and fantasy, whimsy and magic are good for the soul and the imagination. but the story is more thrilling and amazing the more you know factually about it. 

(via themugwumpingwillow)




micro-universe:

The silica shell of a marine diatom, seen with an electron microscope.  Each pillar is about 1 micrometer tall.

micro-universe:

The silica shell of a marine diatom, seen with an electron microscope.  Each pillar is about 1 micrometer tall.

(via knightspiral-deactivated2013092)


tagged as: #gif #science #biology